Category Archives: Poverty

Facts About India

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From the freezing Himalayas in the north, through the jungles and deserts to the blistering heat in the south (trust me, its blistering) India is a fascinating country.

India, and the United States are the 2nd and 3rd most populated countries in the world respectively. USA, has a population of only 322.5 million; that’s almost a fourth of the population of India in a landmass 3 times bigger! [1]

The average age in India is just under 27 years old, and only 9% of the population is over the age of 60.[2]

1/3 of the women are illiterate. Almost 20% of children are married before 15 and almost 50% are married before they’re 18.[3]

There are more people living in poverty (less than a dollar a day) in India than the entire population of the United States and Canada put together.[4]

This information is overwhelming. I almost didn’t even believe it. It can be difficult to know what to do with information like this. One person alone cannot adjust these statistics, but if we work together one village at a time India has amazing potential to grow into a sustainable country.

In this village of 1200 people, our goal is to supply them with:

  • 6 wells
  • 3 classrooms
  • 1 library
  • 177 toilets

Education and hygiene will be instrumental in bringing Bandanpally out of it’s impoverish state. Donate and help transform the village of Bandanpally, and help those living there realize their potential.

— Julia Kutyn


Resources used in this article can be found here: [1] [2] [3]  [4]

 

IDW 2015

IDW 2015

Happy 25th International Development week!

This week, thisvillage has been reflecting on the Millennium Development Goals set out by the UN in 1990. These goals had a deadline to be achieved by 2015 therefore, the UN has also been reviewing them and weighing up their success. In fact, they have unveiled a new set of goals, called Sustainable Development Goals. (ßRead more about them, they’re cool!)

The SDGs consist of 17 targets to reach before 2030. For example, number 1 SDG is: End poverty in all its forms everywhere (whoa! Lofty!).

But hey. We would like to see an end to poverty too. And that’s not the only goal that we can relate to:

Number 3: Ensure healthy lives and promote wellbeing for all ages.

Maternal mortality has fallen 45% since 1990, but we can’t forget that 50% of women do not receive the recommended health care during pregnancy*. One of our major projects in Bandanpally is providing wells and toilets for the community.

Number 4: Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote life long learning opportunities for all.

90% of children in developing countries are now enrolled in primary school, but what about the other 58 million*, or those that are forced to drop out. thisvillage believes in education, and that equipping marginalized community members with confidence and practical skills is essential to their long-term prosperity. Some of the projects we’ll be implementing in Bandanpally include stocking the school library with books and desks.

Number 5: Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls.

The enrolment in primary school is distributed equally among boys and girls*, but women still face inequality in education, work, and decision-making. thisvillage knows that empowering women and children is key to alleviating poverty. One program we’ll be implementing in Bandanpally is a support group for widowed women.

These statistics are encouraging. People working together can make a difference to the injustice in the world. thisvillage works to alleviate poverty on a smaller scale. You can also fight for sustainable international development. Help thisvillage make a difference, one village at a time!

–Julia Kutyn

*All statistics in above article are available at www.un.org/millenniumgoals/

Climbing Mountians

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There’s nothing like a teenage Indian girl climbing Mount Everest to make you feel like you haven’t accomplished much. Malavath Poorna, a thirteen-year-old girl from Nizamabad in Andhra Pradesh, set a new world record in May for being the youngest woman to ever scale the 8,848 meters to the summit of Everest.

Malavath and another student (sixteen-year-old Sadhanapalli Anand Kumar) were selected by Andhra Pradesh Social Welfare Residential Schools to undergo almost a month of training along with 20 other chosen students. After the training Poorna and Kumar were chosen as the toughest and both seized the opportunity to climb the world’s tallest peak.

everest flags(Image source)

“The aim of my expedition was to inspire young people and students from my kind of background”. Malavath is referring to her being born into poverty. Her parents are farmers and make just $600 a year. Rather than seeing this as a disability, Malavath sees it as an opportunity to achieve great feats and inspire others like her to be extraordinary.

Here is an example of one empowered woman determined to accomplish something amazing. Talented and dedicated to her studies, Malavath will not be held back by the oppressive caste system or the limitations others may put on her. Way to go Malavath!

— Julia Kutyn

We’re building a well!

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After only three days of our StartSomeGood campaign, we reached our tipping point. I can’t express how excited I was to wake up Thursday morning, check the project page, and see the words “project tipped!” on my screen.

Besides the fact that reaching our tipping point means the campaign will actually proceed, it also means that we have more than $800: enough money to build one well in the community of Bandanpally. And, let me tell you, the phrase “building wells to change lives” couldn’t be a more accurate statement for our friends in Bandanpally.

Bandanpally is a small, rural community in Andhra Pradesh, India, and having easy access to clean water will truly be a life-changer. When we visited Bandanpally in September 2012, and walked the paths from home to home, and realized how far some homes were from one of the few wells in the community, we knew that something had to change. We certainly knew that the people of Bandanpally had a ways to climb on the ladder of development, but it was made concrete in our visit.

As I’m sure everyone can agree, poverty becomes different when it has a face and a name. If I wasn’t already overwhelmed with love and concern for the women and girls of India, I certainly was after meeting my friend Raman. Raman, a woman only a year or two younger than myself, who had been married since she was a young teen. Raman, who was responsible for the entire household after her husband was seriously injured. By the accident of geography, Raman has a hard life.

Dream with me, for a moment, of how significant having a nearby well spouting clean water would be for someone like Raman. Because these are the sort of crazy dreams that can come true when wells are built.

If you have donated, thank you.
If you haven’t, we’d love it if you would.
http://startsomegood.com/wells

We’re building wells to change lives, and we’d love for you to join with us.

— Christie Esau