Category Archives: Girls

Must See Documentaries About India

10947238_10155114359680367_6919900311834592174_nIt’s Friday, which means it’s movie night! Instead of scrolling through Netflix for hours (I can’t be the only one) try scrolling through this list of amazing documentaries.

Even after traveling to India, there are so many mysteries about the country, and many heartbreaking truths that aren’t immediately observable.

Take a look at these documentaries if you want to learn more about in life in India for women, and for people living in poverty.

India’s Daughter. This documentary (which was actually banned in India) tells the story of Jyoti Singh. Johti was a young, Indian physiotherapy student who was tragically murdered. You can watch this film for free here: http://www.cbc.ca/player/Shows/Shows/ID/2657845142/

Gulabi Gang. A group of women name themselves the Gulabi Gang and fight against gender discrimination, caste oppression, and widespread corruption. If you are interested in the Gulabi Gang also watch this short vice episode on HBO about corruption, rape, and the Gulabi Gang in India.

Poverty, Inc.  Many fighting poverty have their heart in the right place, but is what they are doing really helping impoverish nations to be sustainable? Or is it in fact destroying that nations economy?  Watch the trailer here: https://vimeo.com/109863354

Hit the Road India. This travel documentary follows the adventure of two American friends from Mumbai to Chennai… wait for it… driving in rickshaws! You can rent this film online here: http://www.hittheroadindia.com/

It’s a Girl.  In India, and many other parts of the world today, girls are killed, aborted and abandoned simply because they are girls. “Gendercide” is very real today. Girls who survive are often neglected their whole life. Watch online for free here: http://documentaryaddict.com/its+a+girl-12169-doc.html

On Thursday, March 26th thisvillage is hosting our Indian dinner fundraiser! Come out and help us raise money to create a sustainable future for the widows of Bandanpally, India. Buy Tickets

— Julia Kutyn

 

International Women’s Day 2015

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International Women’s Day is all about celebrating achievements for gender equality and encouraging continued persistence in equality for the future.

Although gender equality is imperfect everywhere, many steps have been taken towards equality. However, it is of utmost importance to remember that in many countries (specifically developing countries) gender equality is still only an unattainable dream to many.

In her speech to the UN, Emma Watson painted a clear picture of what gender equality is: “political, economic, and social equality of the sexes”. She also made it clear that feminism is not “anti-men” because, quite simply, that would not be equality of the sexes would it?

In India many forms of gender inequality are strong. This mindset of inequality affects women’s health, education, and social and economic wellbeing. This also leads to many women being married very young, becoming young mothers, being malnourished and often they cannot afford medical attention. If a woman in India is employed she is often making 30% less than a man, even if they work in the same position.[1]

thisvillage believes in the empowerment, health, and education of women as the key to alleviation of poverty. We want to see the women of India treated as equals.

Join us in supporting the women of India. Invite your friends and attend our fundraiser for the widows of Bandanpally!
Buy Tickets

“Every literate woman marks a victory over poverty.” – Ban Ki-moon[2]

— Julia Kutyn


Facts About India

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From the freezing Himalayas in the north, through the jungles and deserts to the blistering heat in the south (trust me, its blistering) India is a fascinating country.

India, and the United States are the 2nd and 3rd most populated countries in the world respectively. USA, has a population of only 322.5 million; that’s almost a fourth of the population of India in a landmass 3 times bigger! [1]

The average age in India is just under 27 years old, and only 9% of the population is over the age of 60.[2]

1/3 of the women are illiterate. Almost 20% of children are married before 15 and almost 50% are married before they’re 18.[3]

There are more people living in poverty (less than a dollar a day) in India than the entire population of the United States and Canada put together.[4]

This information is overwhelming. I almost didn’t even believe it. It can be difficult to know what to do with information like this. One person alone cannot adjust these statistics, but if we work together one village at a time India has amazing potential to grow into a sustainable country.

In this village of 1200 people, our goal is to supply them with:

  • 6 wells
  • 3 classrooms
  • 1 library
  • 177 toilets

Education and hygiene will be instrumental in bringing Bandanpally out of it’s impoverish state. Donate and help transform the village of Bandanpally, and help those living there realize their potential.

— Julia Kutyn


Resources used in this article can be found here: [1] [2] [3]  [4]

 

IDW 2015

IDW 2015

Happy 25th International Development week!

This week, thisvillage has been reflecting on the Millennium Development Goals set out by the UN in 1990. These goals had a deadline to be achieved by 2015 therefore, the UN has also been reviewing them and weighing up their success. In fact, they have unveiled a new set of goals, called Sustainable Development Goals. (ßRead more about them, they’re cool!)

The SDGs consist of 17 targets to reach before 2030. For example, number 1 SDG is: End poverty in all its forms everywhere (whoa! Lofty!).

But hey. We would like to see an end to poverty too. And that’s not the only goal that we can relate to:

Number 3: Ensure healthy lives and promote wellbeing for all ages.

Maternal mortality has fallen 45% since 1990, but we can’t forget that 50% of women do not receive the recommended health care during pregnancy*. One of our major projects in Bandanpally is providing wells and toilets for the community.

Number 4: Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote life long learning opportunities for all.

90% of children in developing countries are now enrolled in primary school, but what about the other 58 million*, or those that are forced to drop out. thisvillage believes in education, and that equipping marginalized community members with confidence and practical skills is essential to their long-term prosperity. Some of the projects we’ll be implementing in Bandanpally include stocking the school library with books and desks.

Number 5: Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls.

The enrolment in primary school is distributed equally among boys and girls*, but women still face inequality in education, work, and decision-making. thisvillage knows that empowering women and children is key to alleviating poverty. One program we’ll be implementing in Bandanpally is a support group for widowed women.

These statistics are encouraging. People working together can make a difference to the injustice in the world. thisvillage works to alleviate poverty on a smaller scale. You can also fight for sustainable international development. Help thisvillage make a difference, one village at a time!

–Julia Kutyn

*All statistics in above article are available at www.un.org/millenniumgoals/