Must See Documentaries About India

10947238_10155114359680367_6919900311834592174_nIt’s Friday, which means it’s movie night! Instead of scrolling through Netflix for hours (I can’t be the only one) try scrolling through this list of amazing documentaries.

Even after traveling to India, there are so many mysteries about the country, and many heartbreaking truths that aren’t immediately observable.

Take a look at these documentaries if you want to learn more about in life in India for women, and for people living in poverty.

India’s Daughter. This documentary (which was actually banned in India) tells the story of Jyoti Singh. Johti was a young, Indian physiotherapy student who was tragically murdered. You can watch this film for free here: http://www.cbc.ca/player/Shows/Shows/ID/2657845142/

Gulabi Gang. A group of women name themselves the Gulabi Gang and fight against gender discrimination, caste oppression, and widespread corruption. If you are interested in the Gulabi Gang also watch this short vice episode on HBO about corruption, rape, and the Gulabi Gang in India.

Poverty, Inc.  Many fighting poverty have their heart in the right place, but is what they are doing really helping impoverish nations to be sustainable? Or is it in fact destroying that nations economy?  Watch the trailer here: https://vimeo.com/109863354

Hit the Road India. This travel documentary follows the adventure of two American friends from Mumbai to Chennai… wait for it… driving in rickshaws! You can rent this film online here: http://www.hittheroadindia.com/

It’s a Girl.  In India, and many other parts of the world today, girls are killed, aborted and abandoned simply because they are girls. “Gendercide” is very real today. Girls who survive are often neglected their whole life. Watch online for free here: http://documentaryaddict.com/its+a+girl-12169-doc.html

On Thursday, March 26th thisvillage is hosting our Indian dinner fundraiser! Come out and help us raise money to create a sustainable future for the widows of Bandanpally, India. Buy Tickets

— Julia Kutyn

 

International Women’s Day 2015

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International Women’s Day is all about celebrating achievements for gender equality and encouraging continued persistence in equality for the future.

Although gender equality is imperfect everywhere, many steps have been taken towards equality. However, it is of utmost importance to remember that in many countries (specifically developing countries) gender equality is still only an unattainable dream to many.

In her speech to the UN, Emma Watson painted a clear picture of what gender equality is: “political, economic, and social equality of the sexes”. She also made it clear that feminism is not “anti-men” because, quite simply, that would not be equality of the sexes would it?

In India many forms of gender inequality are strong. This mindset of inequality affects women’s health, education, and social and economic wellbeing. This also leads to many women being married very young, becoming young mothers, being malnourished and often they cannot afford medical attention. If a woman in India is employed she is often making 30% less than a man, even if they work in the same position.[1]

thisvillage believes in the empowerment, health, and education of women as the key to alleviation of poverty. We want to see the women of India treated as equals.

Join us in supporting the women of India. Invite your friends and attend our fundraiser for the widows of Bandanpally!
Buy Tickets

“Every literate woman marks a victory over poverty.” – Ban Ki-moon[2]

— Julia Kutyn


All Food is Finger Food

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India is famous for the wonderful flavours of the exotic dishes it produces. From tasty chutneys and spicy curry to sweet chai and rose flavoured desserts, India has very unique style of cooking and using spices and herbs for an explosive flavour. 

While dining in India it quickly becomes evident that something is missing from the table setting: cutlery! There are many reasons why Indians eat with their hands. First, many eat with their hands because they think it is in fact cleaner to eat with fingers than with a fork or spoon. They know where their hands have been and they wash thoroughly before and after meals. Others believe that interacting with their food, not only by smelling, tasting and seeing it but also feeling it, is all part of the experience of eating. (Also it’s kind of fun!)

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India is a large country, so naturally the food varies in different regions of India. In the south, the food is generally unbearably spicy compared to the north. There are also often more vegetarians in the south. Along the coast lines seafood dishes are more popular, whereas in the jungles of India many tropical fruits can be found such as: mango, banana, coconut, guava and papaya.

My favourite recipe I learned while living in India is to make Masala Chai. Follow my recipe to try it out! What you will need for two mugs of Chai:

–       2 heaping tablespoons of loose leaf black tea.

–       2 cups of milk

–       ½ cup of water

–       2 tablespoons of sugar

–       3 teaspoons of fresh ginger (chopped)

–       Cinnamon, cloves, and cardamom to taste (I prefer chai with ginger only)

Heat saucepan with milk and water on stove on medium high for about three minutes. Add the tealeaves and stir until milk becomes a desirable colour. Add sugar and ginger and spices. Bring to boil then remove from heat and strain into mugs. Enjoy!

P.S. If you want a chance to try some delicious Indian dishes, desserts, and chai come to our Indian Dinner Fundraiser! More info here.

Buy Tickets

— Julia Kutyn

Exciting News!

403123_10151223783530192_70022161_nWe have been preparing for something big here at thisvillage. Something you are not going to want to miss.

thisvillage is hosting our first ever Indian Dinner Event!!

Get ready for an evening of chai, henna, and (of course) delicious, authentic Indian food.

Why are we doing this?

In the state of Telangana, where most people are farmers, almost 90% of households are in debt. Debt is one of the biggest reasons that farmers commit suicide. Currently, Bandanpally is home to 42 widows as a result of farmer suicide. Thought of as cursed, these widows are punished and ostracized by society for no other reason than the death of their husbands.

We want to take this time to focus on the needs of these widows; most of them do not have any source of income. (Read more about all our projects in Bandanpally at http://thisvillage.org/about/)

When and where is the event happening?

On March 26th from 5:30 – 9:30, at the Hub, located at 71 Bank street Ottawa on the 6th floor, Take a peek at our venue here!

P.S (Parking on the Bank street is free after 5:30, or take your pick of lots near by. http://en.parkopedia.ca/parking/71_bank_street/)

You don’t want to miss this event!

Buy Tickets